American Aristocracy

Douglas Fairbanks, barely past his first year of movie-making, not only rolls, climbs a tree, jumps fences/cars/benches, climbs onto a moving car then jumps off and hangs from a wire, and gratuitously does every other animal act trick (other than roll over and beg - that's the one he used to get this gig), but also spanks and kisses his servant, pole dances, endlessly swaggers like an ape with a broomstick up its ass, and generally works hard to be overconfident, overbearing, and terribly annoying - i.e. the embodiment of the imagined ethos of early twentieth century white American maleness. A comedy, minus the laughs, more like news from home - which is, a title card tells us, generally bad.

Related:

The Oyster Princess

A grotesque view of the excesses of early 20th century American aristocracy, aptly in accord with the comedic axiom, “A lot is funny, more is funnier, too much is riotously absurd”. The dialogue is not nearly as witty as it seems to want to be, but with visuals like this, who needs words? Parental advisory: includes scenes of gratuitous foxtrot.

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